Obesity and Lipid Disorders: Impact on Cholesterol Levels

Cloud Banner

Elevated LDL Cholesterol: Obesity is often associated with elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, commonly known as "bad" cholesterol. High levels of LDL cholesterol contribute to the buildup of plaque in arteries.

Cloud Banner

Reduced HDL Cholesterol: Obesity can lead to lower levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, often referred to as "good" cholesterol. HDL cholesterol helps remove LDL cholesterol from the bloodstream.

Cloud Banner

Triglyceride Increase: Obesity is linked to elevated triglyceride levels, a type of fat in the blood. High triglycerides, along with high LDL cholesterol and low HDL cholesterol, contribute to the development of atherogenic dyslipidemia.

Cloud Banner

Insulin Resistance: Obesity is associated with insulin resistance, which can impact lipid metabolism. Insulin resistance contributes to higher levels of circulating triglycerides and LDL cholesterol.

Cloud Banner

Atherogenic Dyslipidemia: The combination of high triglycerides, elevated LDL cholesterol, and low HDL cholesterol in obesity contributes to atherogenic dyslipidemia, increasing the risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease.

Cloud Banner

Inflammatory Response: Adipose tissue in obesity releases pro-inflammatory substances, contributing to systemic inflammation that can impact lipid metabolism and cholesterol levels.

Cloud Banner

Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD): Obesity is a risk factor for NAFLD, which can lead to abnormal lipid profiles. NAFLD is associated with increased triglycerides and reduced HDL cholesterol.

Cloud Banner

Endocrine Disruption: Obesity can disrupt endocrine function, affecting hormones involved in lipid metabolism. This disruption can contribute to unfavorable changes in cholesterol levels.

more stories and articles

Heart